The John Curtin School of Medical Research

The ANU John Curtin School of Medical Research is Australia’s national medical research institute. We excel in multidisciplinary, translational medical research in fields including immunology, cancer, genomics, neuroscience, mental health, infectious diseases, obesity and metabolic disorders.

Our research aims to understand and provide novel insights into diseases including cancer, diabetes and rheumatoid arthritis, and conditions such as epilepsy and vision impairment, amongst others. Research at JCSMR is organised within four departments including the ACRF Department of Cancer Biology and Therapeutics, Eccles Institute of Neuroscience, Genome Sciences and Immunology and Infectious Disease departments.

Each department is comprised of independent groups and laboratories. As an integral part of the ANU College of Health and Medicine, we are committed to cross-disciplinary research that will provide solutions to health problems which beset our community. In addition, we continue to pride ourselves on our commitment to the training and mentoring of the young medical researchers of the future.

In 2015, the School’s Professor Carola Vinuesa was elected Fellow of the Australian Academy of Science, and Professors Simon Foote and Chris Parish became Fellows of the newly established Australian Academy of Health and Medical Sciences.

Three of our researchers have received Nobel Prizes in Physiology or Medicine for work conducted in the School.

Field sites & facilities

Explore some of the numerous of research sites and facilities established by our research schools in Australia and across the world. Researchers and students at ANU enjoy access to state-of-the-art equipment to help facilitate ground-breaking research.

Research projects

Browse research topics of the College of Science and the College of Health & Medicine with links to relevant researchers.

See our list of potential student projects to apply for PhB, Honours, PhD and other graduate degrees.

Stories

Platelet-red blood cell complex, in which a platelet (arrow) is attached to the surface of a red cell, viewed using scanning electron microscopy (bar length = 1 µm)

News, Research story

Scientists discover new function of platelets that remove old red blood cells

Researchers at the John Curtin School of Medical Research (JCSMR) have found a new function of platelets apart from their known role in preventing bleeding and helping us fight off infections.

Associate Professor Simon Jiang in his lab at the John Curtin School of Medical Research at ANU.

News, Research story

The power of personalised care

The benefits of personalised medicine programs extend far beyond the individual patient.

ANU graduate and melanoma researcher Phoebe Doohan in her lab at JCSMR, the ANU College of Health & Medicine at ANU in Canberra.

News

How our own immune system can help fight cancer

The findings mean patients could respond better to immunotherapy treatment. 

Sarah Mann leads the JCSMR choir during an end of year concert.

News

JCSMR researchers sing to a different tune

The magic of song is helping a group of ANU College of Health and Medicine academics escape the demands of research.

News

Two more ANU Rhodes Scholars sets new record for Australian universities

ANU graduates will help fight infectious diseases and neurodegeneration having just won prestigious Rhodes Scholarships.

News

RNA vaccines rose to prominence during COVID, but we've only scratched the surface of their potential

In high school biology, students are taught the central concept of genetics in a very simple way: DNA makes RNA, RNA makes protein, and protein makes life. ANU Researchers claim we're only scratching the surface of their potential to improve human health.

Research story

What do I need to know about the Moderna vaccine? And how does it compare with Pfizer?

Australia’s medical regulator has provisionally approved another COVID-19 vaccine, Moderna, for use in Australia. One million doses of Moderna are due in the second half of September and three million doses a month will begin to arrive from October.

Dr Paula Gonzalez Figueroa

News

New natural answers for killer allergies

Researchers have discovered a function in the immune system that could hold the key to treating allergic conditions like asthma and stop anaphylaxis.

News

Women who lead: the power and the passion

Why is it that women-led countries have been so successful in their response to COVID-19?

Amber Condell standing near some trees

Student profile

The science of genetics is written into Amber’s story

Where most people might learn about the science of genetics from a textbook, for Amber, it’s never been separable from her lived experience of it.

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